Conference day 3 – 18 October

9:00 – 9:30 am
FOYER 1st floor

DAILY REGISTRATIONS

AGUASCALIENTES Room (2nd floor)

09:30 – 10:30 pm

Panel: PECO8

What works to promote female entrepreneurs? Lessons from around the world

Affiliation:

World Bank

Chair:

Denis Medvedev

Presenters: 

Lourdes Rodriguez Chamussy
Leonardo Iacovone

Abstract:

Only a small minority of women manage to successfully set up and break into profitable small and medium businesses. Women entrepreneurs face numerous challenges finance and grow businesses, for example 70 percent of women-owned SMEs in developing countries can’t get the capital they need. At the same time, lack of knowledge and links to high value markets further limit female entrepreneurship. The session will present various studies and rigorous evaluations from different countries, including Mexico, testing novel interventions to promote female entrepreneurship. It will present results of work focusing on a novel approach to training focused on soft skills (i.e. personal initiative), as well as work to expand access to finance, and work to promote the capacity of women entrepreneurs to cross-over into higher profitability sectors typically dominated by male entrepreneurs.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

Campbell Collaboration Groups

Meetings open to all participants of the WWGS

BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

Campbell Collaboration Business and Management systematic reviews

 

Affiliation:

Co-chair of the Campbell Business and Management coordinating group

Presenter: 

Denise Rousseau
Eric Barends

Abstract:

We provide an update on BMCG activities including submissions pipeline and activities to promote submissions (including training and development of doctoral programs focused on systematic review creation).
Learn about one of Campbell’s newest coordinating groups, the Business and Management group, and meet group Co-chair Denise M. Rousseau, a world-renowned expert in management sciences. Our current review titles include research on: work autonomy, leadership styles, workplace coaching, multisource feedback, job interview technologies, virtual teams, CEO incentives, negotiating strategies, and performance pay schemes. Discussion will focus on how you can become involved in the work of this group.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Campbell Collaboration Groups

Meetings open to all participants of the WWGS

METHODS

Campbell Collaboration Methods reviews

 

Affiliation:

Co-chair of the Campbell Business and Management coordinating group

Presenter: 

Ruth Garside

Abstract:

We provide an update on Methods CG activities including new guidance in development
Learn about Campbell’s Methods Coordinating Group, and meet new group Co-chair Ruth Garside, an expert in qualitative evidence synthesis and mixed methods syntheses. We will provide updates on the work of group, including developments in Information Retrieval, Qualitative Evidence Synthesis and Overviews of Reviews. Discussion will focus on how you can become involved in the work of this group.

OVERVIEW OF REVIEWS

Campbell Collaboration working group on overviews of reviews

 

Presenters: 

Elizabeth Kristjansson
Brandy Maynard

Abstract:

Please come join us for a discussion of overview methodology. The Overview methods group has developed guidance on when an overview is relevant and when it is not. We have also developed a methodological checklist. The Methodological Expectations of Campbell Collaboration Overviews or MECCO, is ready for your review and input. Please come to our meeting to meet us and discuss your ideas. We will send material out to interested participants before the session so that you can review it and come with questions and ideas. We welcome input and new members!

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

NUEVO LEON I Room (3rd floor)

09:30 – 10:30 am

Panel: PECO10

Integrating evidence into policy-making: the role and use of impact evaluations

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Chair:

Yamini Atmavilas

Presenters: 

Nita Kejrewal
Anjini Kochar
Rohan Shah
Bidisha Barooah
Gayatri Acharya

Abstract:

India’s National Rural Livelihood Mission is one of the biggest poverty alleviation programmes in the world. It focuses on organizing rural women into economic groups and using them as platforms to promote livelihoods activities and social protection. This panel aims to present and discuss the results of an impact evaluation of NRLM across 9 states and a sample of approximately 27,000 Households.
Nita Kejrewal will introduce the programme, the need for its evaluation and its policy implications. Balakrishnan Madhavan Kutty will present the complexities of the NRLM project  and Anjini Kochar will discuss the design of the evaluation and present its preliminary findings.This session will be of interest to those interested in large scale programmes aimed at improving the livelihood of the poor and the marginalized.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

The What Works Movement: Sharing Global Experiences

Chair: 
Mark Schneider

 

The What Works Clearing House
Presenter: 
Matthew Soldner, What Works Clearing House, IES, USA

Abstract:
This presentation will cover: (1) Purpose and goals of the WWC; (2) Overview of WWC and ESSA evidence standards, including how Congress/ED are using evidence standards to both shape classroom practice and build the evidence base; (3) Show off key products; and (4) Discuss opportunities and challenges.

 

Living Systematic Reviews for Education
Presenter: 
Jennifer Stevenson, Education Endowment Foundation, UK

Abstract:
This presentation will introduce the EEF’s new education database. The EEF’s Teaching and Learning Toolkit is a meta-meta-analysis of global education evidence, used by two-thirds of English headteachers, and re-contextualised for education systems in Australia, Spain, Scotland, and Latin America. EEF are updating this resource by moving from 35 meta-meta-analyses to 35 living systematic reviews. The underlying database will contain thousands of impact studies. Each will be coded for around 100 variables, consistent across reviews – allowing exploration of methodological and substantive factors driving impact estimates. The presentation will describe database functionalities and benefits for evidence access. The long-term vision will be presented, including using machine learning to automate inclusion, challenges of maintaining living systematic reviews and collaboration opportunities.

 

Using Evidence to Reduce Homelessness
Presenter: 
Ligia Tiexiera, Director, Centre for Homelessness Impact

Abstract:
The Centre for Homelessness Impact is promoting the use of evidence to eliminate homelessness across the UK. The presentation will provide an overview of the evidence tools developed by the Centre and their engagement with stakeholders to promote the production and use of evidence. See https://www.homelessnessimpact.org/

 

What Works for Children’s Social Care
Presenter: 
Michael Sanders, Director, What Works for Children’s Social Care

Abstract:
What Works for Children’s Social Care seeks better outcomes for children, young people and families by bringing the best available evidence to practitioners and other decision makers across the children’s social care sector. The presentation will demonstrate the Centre’s approach to generating and presenting evidence of effectiveness.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Parallel session: Food systems
Chair: David Ameyaw

Changing the logic of agricultural extension in Kenya

 

Affiliation:

American Institutes for Research

Presenter: 

Juan Bonilla

Abstract:

We conducted a mixed-methods experimental evaluation of Plantwise, a program that provide smallholder farmers with low-cost access to plant health information and diagnosis of plant health issues through a system of plant clinics. Results from the farm-level randomized controlled trial in 13 counties confirm that Plantwise contributed to improved yields and incomes and reduced pesticide usage for farmers who live in plant clinic catchment areas. The results also showed that Plantwise improved institutional coordination in the plant health system, knowledge of both farmers and extension agents, and the likelihood of identifying and timely reporting of pest outbreaks. A cost-benefit analysis show that the monetary benefits created by the intervention for farmers in treatment areas outweigh the program costs after at least three years of program implementation.

Adressing food insecurity: does the choice of transfer modality matter?

 

Affiliation:

World Food Programme

Presenter: 

Rossella Bottone

Abstract:

WFP has conducted a study on the effects of Multipurpose Cash (MPC) in El Salvador. The study aimed at comparing vouchers, cash and MPC and exploring how differently each type of assistance generates effects on the food security of households affected by the drought. Quantitative and panel analyses focused on the behaviour of key WFP food security indicators and explored the influence of key households’ features (who took decisions, time taken to spend cash entitlements, dependency ratio and main livelihoods) on food security outcomes. Qualitative analysis, instead, aimed at providing in-depth and detailed descriptive answers to the evaluation questions. The analysis indicates that while all types of assistance improved households’ food security but MPC transfers resulted in improvements that were better maintained over time.

Impact of Post-harvest Loss Interventions on Post-Harvest Losses of Maize among Small Holder Farmers in Tanzania: A Difference in Difference (DID) Analysis

 

Affiliation:

University of Nairobi

Presenter: 

Joy Kiiru

Abstract:

This study is a Randomised Controlled Trial to test the impact of three simple and cost effective post harvest loss prevention innovations suitable for low and middle income economies who suffer the brunt of post-harvest loses. The study uses propensity score matching (PSM) and difference in difference (DID) method to empirically evaluate impact. Results show that the innovations contributed to a reduction in postharvest losses amounting to about 273.6 Kilos of maize per household (About 3 bags per household). We conclude that simple cost effective postharvest loss mitigation innovations could go along a way in combatting food security and household incomes.

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

SONORA Room (2nd floor)

09:30 – 10:30 pm

Panel: PHEA4

Developing guidance for when and how to replicate systematic reviews

Affiliation:

University of Ottawa

Chair:

Vivian Welch

Presenters: 

Jeremy Grimshaw
Howard White
Terri Pigott
Elizabeth Kristjansson
Peter Tugwell

Abstract:

Replication is a corner stone of the scientific method yet replication of systematic reviews is too often overlooked, done unnecessarily or done poorly. Failure to replicate may lead to continued uncertainty about the implications of a body of evidence. Too frequent replication can represent an inefficient use of scarce systematic review resources and may generate noise to signal. There is a lack of guidance for when and why to replicate systematic reviews.
Our team aims to establish evidence-informed consensus-based guidance on when to, and when not to replicate systematic reviews. Based on a systematic literature review, key informant interviews, an online survey and a consensus meeting involving key stakeholder groups, we are developing a systematic review replication framework and a checklist to determine when and how to replicate systematic reviews.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

Panel: PECO11

Social learning for public policies development: transparency and citizen use of evidence

Affiliation:

CLEAR LAC and CONEVAL

Chair:

Gabriela Pérez Yarahuán

Presenters: 

Guillermo Cejudo, CIDE
Gonzalo Hernández Licona
Gloria del Castillo Castillo

Abstract:

The use of evidence in public policies has expanded around the world and is materialized in the monitoring and evaluation of public policies. However, the degree of influence of the evaluative exercises in decision-making, transparency and accountability is due to the maturation of institutions and stakeholders in charge of monitoring and evaluating, as well as to political situations and citizen demands. Nevertheless, knowing what works and to what extent, as well as its costs and benefits, are queries that systematic evaluation can satisfactorily clear up. Therefore, it is intended to discuss about the participants in the evaluation processes, the mechanisms that allow for their coordination and participation, the scope and limitations of participatory evaluation, as well as the ways in which the lessons of different evaluations can be implemented in the national development.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Parallel session: Evidence to policy in health
Chair: Denny John

Using Data Visualization to Drive Decision-making, Address Data Use Challenges, and Strengthen Health System Responses for HIV/AIDS: Lessons Learnt from Zambia and Cote d’Ivoire

 

Affiliation:

AidData

Presenter: 

Emilie Efronson

Abstract:

Equipping domestic policy makers and development partners with access to easily digestible disaggregated data on HIV/AIDS incidence, prevalence, treatment, and investments is one critical aspect to ensuring resources are effectively allocated and solutions are customized to districts and provinces with the greatest need. However, strengthening a national Health Management Information System that is able to effectively respond to the HIV/AIDS epidemic requires more than just data in data out -it requires data users to have data competency for effective analysis and interpretation for problem solving. Through two examples, Zambia and Cote d’Ivoire, we discuss lessons learnt on how impact can be increased through the use of data visualization to drive decision-making and how geospatial data can build capacity for data-driven decision-making in other developing countries.

Meta-analysis on the Intervention Effect of Signing the Family Doctor service Mode at Higher Risk of Chronic Diseases in Community

 

Affiliation:

Evidence-based Medicine Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University

Presenter: 

Liujiao Cao

Abstract:

To explore the intervention effect of Signing the family doctor service mode at higher risk of chronic diseases in community in china. PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CNKI, and CBM will be searched without search date and language restriction using “family doctor”, “sign*”, “chronic diseases”, “hypertension” and “diabetes” etc. The Loney criteria will be used to assess included studies. The R3.4.4 software was used to meta intervention effect. Subgroup analysis will be undertaken on gender, age, specific diseases and behavior habit. Also, sensitivity analysis will be performed to evaluate stability of the research results. This study is ongoing, and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. This study will provide a comprehensive information on the significance of signing the family doctor service mode in china, and will provide reference to other countries.

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

NUEVO LEON II Room (3rd floor)

09:30 – 10:30 am

Panel: EXT4

Evidence Use in Practice – lessons from Africa

Affiliation:

CLEAR Anglophone Africa

Chairs:

Ian Goldman and Mine Pabari

Presenters: 

Lauren’s Langer, University of Johannesburg
Carol Nuga Deliwe, Department of Basic Education, South Africa
Rhona Mijumbi-Deve, African Centre for Rapid Synthesis
Mine Pabari, CLEAR Anglophone Africa

Abstract:

A book is being researched and written on evidence use in Africa, led by CLEAR-AA. Authors are from 6 countries (Benin, Uganda, South Africa, Senegal, Ghana and Kenya) and include policy-makers and researchers who reflect on the lessons from using evidence generated from evaluations, citizen evidence, research and evidence synthesis.

The session is moderated by Ian Goldman and Mine Pabari from CLEAR Anglophone Africa and will have five presentations of 5-10 minutes, followed by 15 minutes question and answer with the audience.

This panel session starts with the analytical framework being used to understand evidence use presented by Lauren’s Langer of the African Centre for Evidence at the University of Johannesburg. Policy-makers/researchers will present the lessons from three African case studies, including use of evidence by the South African Department of Basic Education (Carol Nuga Deliwe, from the Department), the use of rapid synthesis by the Centre for Rapid Synthesis at Makerere University (Rhona Mijumbi-Deve), and on citizen engagement in the development of the Wildlife Conservation and Management Act in Kenya (Mine Pabari). Finally Ian Goldman will draw lessons from the six cases.

The advisory group for the book is drawn from Uganda’s Office of Prime Minister; Benin Presidency; Department of Planning, M&E in South Africa; 3ie, IDRC, AFREA, UCT, ICED, AFIDEP, CLEAR Anglophone Africa, Hewlett Foundation (the funders) and DFID.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

Parallel session: Living and rapid evidence synthesis
Chair: Mukdarut Bangpan

Rapid systematic mapping to learn about climate solutions from urban case studies

 

Affiliation:

Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC)

Presenter: 

Jan Minx

Abstract:

Climate mitigation research puts increasing emphasis on cities, but much more could be learned from urban case studies. The overall size, geographic scope and topic content of cases remains unknown, resulting in few attempts to synthesise the bottom up evidence. Here, we use scientometric and machine-learning methods to produce a comprehensive map of the literature. Our database of approximately 4,000 case studies provides a wealth of evidence to search, compare and review. We find that cities in world regions with the highest future mitigation relevance are systematically underrepresented. A map of the evidence allows case studies to be matched with urban typologies in new and more ambitious forms of synthesis, bringing together traditionally separate strands of qualitative and quantitative urban research.

Efficient, timely and living evidence synthesis: opportunities in international development

 

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenter: 

Birte Snilstveit

Abstract:

This presentation will outline opportunities for more efficient and timely review production in international development, including, but not limited to ‘living systematic reviews’. Based on a combination of literature review, worked examples, feasibility testing and modelling approaches the presentation will summarise the opportunities that are currently available for systematic review teams wanting to produce studies more efficiently. It will also lay out the implications for methodological research and outline a vision for an evidence infrastructure for the future, where researchers can produce systematic
reviews and other evidence syntheses much more quickly and efficiently.

Small team rapid evidence review

 

Affiliation:

FHI 360

Presenter: 

Annette Brown

Abstract:

Most rapid evidence review methods rely on a large team or a very limited evidence base. We developed a methodology for rapid evidence review that can be conducted by a small team over a period of roughly four weeks. We designed the methodology specifically for non-public health review questions – those for which existing systematic reviews are likely to be limited and grey literature more prevalent. The methodology takes advantage of the increase in evidence maps in recent years and includes a simplified risk of bias assessment tool that can be applied by non-researchers. We piloted this methodology on two review questions supporting the design of new projects in our organization. In this paper, we present the methodology and the results of the pilot reviews.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Parallel session: Sustainable development goals
Chair: Ashrita Saran

Transparency and Accountability Interventions in the Extractive Sector: an Evidence Gap Map

 

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenter: 

Francis Rathinam

Abstract:

The objective of this Evidence Gap Map (EGM) is twofold. Firstly, it aims to identify, appraise and describe existing evidence from impact evaluations of the effect of transparency and accountability interventions in the extractive sectors on development and environmental outcomes. Secondly, by visually mapping out existing research against interventions and outcomes, it helps identifying existing evidence gaps where new primary studies and systematic reviews are needed to better inform decision-making in this field.We included impact evaluations using experimental or quasi-experimental design, and systematic reviews of impact evaluations conducted in LMICs. This analysis focusses on absolute gaps; synthesis gaps; and any imbalance in the evidence base. We expect the EGM to systematically contribute to future body of research and policy.

Evidence based lawmaking: insights for social policy

 

Affiliation:

Instituto Belisario Domínguez

Presenter: 

Perla Carolina Gris Legorreta

Abstract:

The presentation aims to discuss the relevance of strengthening the use of evidence in the law-making process to characterize the social problems that demand public intervention. The discussion will focus on the linkage between evidence producers and consumers within the sphere of the Legislative branch. Also, it will identify the sources of evidence at disposal of the members of the Mexican Senate and the technical capabilities existent in this body to identify, analyse, use and disseminate evidence to generate legal instruments that will shape social policy. Finally, the use of evidence in the legislative context also leads to reflect upon the need to increase public trust in this body.

Payments for environmental services: do we get what we pay for?

 

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenter: 

Birte Snilstveit

Abstract:

Payment for environmental services (PES) provide incentives to landowners to adopt behaviours that are thought to conserve or restore ecosystems services. PES have grown in popularity in the last two decades, initially as a means of environmental conservation and more recently to improve socio-economic outcomes. Despite their increasing popularity, questions around the effects of PES on environmental and socio-economic outcomes remain unanswered. This presentation will summarise the results of a Campbell mixed-methods systematic review on PES’s effects on environmental and socio-economic outcomes in LMICs. We will present findings from the review’s statistical meta-analysis and the thematic synthesis. Based on the combined synthesis results, we will reflect whether the largescale investment by development actors in PES can be regarded to have shown results and to present value for money.

Citizen engagement in public services through participation, inclusion, transparency and accountability (PITA)

 

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenter: 

Ada Sonnefeld

Abstract:

This systematic review looked at whether citizen engagement interventions in L&MICs improve outcomes compared to standard public service delivery along the results chain from immediate outcomes (active citizenship and provider actions), intermediate outcomes (access, quality and use of public services) to final outcomes (citizen wellbeing and relations between State and citizens). The review also analysed the mechanisms operating in citizen engagement interventions.

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

JALISCO Room (3rd floor)

09:30 – 10:30 am

Panel

Big Data, public policy and learning

Affiliation:

CAF

Chair:

Daniel Ortega

Presenters:

Federico Juncosa, researcher, Research Department, CAF
Dulce Colin, Director of the Centre for Honest Government, Mexico City
Pablo Villarreal, Director of the Digital Platform of the National Anti-corruption system, Mexico

Abstract:

A tidal wave of data and analytical capacity has changed the possibilities for private businesses but also for public policy. This panel will discuss the role of these new frontiers in the way we think about policy design and provide specific examples of CAF initiatives that are geared towards supporting the data infrastructure in the region, building capacity in public institutions for better use of data for the design and monitoring of policy interventions, and also capacity building for sustained policy learning as the ultimate goal of the impact evaluation agenda. The panel will also feature a significant innovation in data infrastructure and use for promoting transparency and integrity in the Mexican public sector, where the interplay between capacity building for learning about public policy and the formal institutional setting is key for producing quality diagnostics and evidence informed policy decisions.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

Parallel session: Implementation research in health
Chair: Juan Bonilla

Immunisation: How formative evaluations can help design relevant programmes

 

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenter: 

Stuti Tripathi

Abstract:

The paper synthesizes evidence from formative evaluation of 6 pilot programs to assess the feasibility of adopting community-based approaches for delivery of immunization services in Ethiopia, Nigeria, Myanmar and Pakistan. There is growing realization that formative evaluations can help design programs that are feasible to implement, adequately address the developmental issue at hand, and are culturally and geographically appropriate and acceptable. Drawing on a range of study-related documents and stakeholder interviews, the synthesis looks at factors affecting program reach and take up among targeted participants; feasibility of delivering the intervention using existing health infrastructure and its acceptability among service providers, especially frontline staff; and any contextual barriers and facilitators that have a bearing on the program theory of change and its implementation.

A study of knowledge brokering in vocational rehabilitation contexts

 

Affiliation:

American Institutes for Research

Presenter: 

Kathleen Murphy

Abstract:

The US-based Knowledge Translation for Employment Research Center (KTER) promotes the use of research to improve employment for individuals with disabilities. One of KTER’s efforts is a study of knowledge brokers in vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies. KTER held focus groups to assess stakeholders’ needs for research-based information related to the employment of transition-aged youth with disabilities, and adults with autism. Focus group data informed topic selection for two scoping reviews; KTER packaged findings into online interactive modules. After completing this training, KTER provided VR supervisors with 6-months of ongoing support in their knowledge broker role. KTER measured outcomes among study participants (members of training and control groups, as well as the staff supervised) with pre/post surveys that collected data regarding use of research on-the-job.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Parallel session: Violence and trauma
Chair: Liam O’Hare

Trauma as a predictor of reoffending in a Northern Irish probation sample

 

Affiliation:

Queens University of Belfast

Presenter: 

Donncha Hanna

Abstract:

The aim of the current study was to investigate whether childhood trauma and trauma due to ‘the Troubles’ among offenders who have served a life sentence in Northern Ireland was associated with general and violent reoffending patterns. The casefiles of 100 offenders were coded for trauma experiences and official reoffending data was extracted. The most common form of childhood trauma were emotional abuse and/or emotional neglect (n=43) and physical abuse (n=40). Only age (OR .91) and conflict-related trauma (OR 5.57) emerged as significant predictors of general reoffending at any time post release. Similarly, only age (OR .92) and conflict-related trauma (OR 4.47) emerged as significant predictors of violent reoffending. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.

The incidence rates of child abuse in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis

 

Affiliation:

Evidence-based Medicine Center, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University

Presenter: 

Rui Li

Abstract:

Background Child abuse in Chinese families has seriously affected the healthy development of children and brought serious harm to families, society and the country.
Objective The meta-analysis on the incidence rate on child abuse in China to offer basic information for child protection practice.
Methods PubMed, Springer, VIP, CNKI, Wanfang and CBM will be searched without search date and language restriction using “child”, “kid”, “juvenile” and “abuse” etc. The Loney criteria will be used to assess included studies. The R3.4.4 software was used to meta incidence rate. Subgroup analysis will be undertaken on gender, age, region, abuser, types of child abuse and violence object. Also, sensitivity analysis will be performed to evaluate stability of the research results.
Results This study is ongoing, and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication.

Prevalence reviews of social phenomena: the case of violence against children

 

Affiliation:

Campbell Collaboration

Presenter: 

Howard White

Abstract:

Prevalence reviews are useful to inform policy by showing the depth and distribution of social issues such as violence, loneliness, substance abuse and so on. To date prevalence reviews, common in health, are rare in other areas. Hence there is little expertise or guidance on the issues involved in conducting such a review such as differences in definition, measurement tool, reference period and reference population. These issues are illustrated by comparing recent prevalence reviews of violence against children conducted by WHO and PAHO.

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

HIDALGO Room (1st floor)

09:30 – 10:30 am

Panel: PHEA5

Safe, Resilient and Inclusive Hospital

Affiliation:

Conferencia Interamericana de Seguridad Social

Chair:

Roberto Castillo (Interamerican Conference on Social Security)

Presenters: 

Dr. Felipe Cruz (IMSS)
Óscar Zepeda (General Cordination of Civil Protection in México)
Dra. Sandra Elizondo (IMSS)

Abstract:

Safe Hospital is a strategy created to warranty that health facilities in the immediate wake of an emergency or disaster, remain accessible, and their operations remain functional at their maximum installed capacity with the facilities usual infrastructure. This strategy rests on three fundamental pillars: to protect life, function and investment. Safe hospital has been widely recognized internationally and was nominated for the Sasakawa Award for Disaster Risk Reduction in 2015.
Safe, Resilient and Inclusive Hospital, is the one that -in addition to Safe hospital- is respectful with the environment and it is inclusive with people with disabilities, so it is prepared to resist, absorb, readapt and recover from the impact of an event in a timely and efficient manner, through the integral disaster risk management and with a multihazard approach.

10:30 – 11:00 am
FOYER 1st floor 

Coffee break – Networking

11:00 – 12:00 pm 

Parallel session: Social inclusion and social mobility
Chair: Joann Starks

Disability inclusive elections In Africa: A systematic review of published and unpublished literature

 

Affiliation:

Sightsavers

Presenter: 

Bhavisha Virendrakumar

Abstract:

This review aimed to understand legislation, experiences and practices related to participation of people with disabilities (PWDs) in electoral processes/political life. Findings showed that most African countries ratified important disability-focused legislation, however, implementation and practices varies greatly across the continent. Challenges experienced by PWDs can be categorised into three groups: lack of education and financial resources; stigma and negative social attitudes and; inaccessible physical infrastructure. The impact of strategies to support inclusive electoral and political processes remains unclear, the theory of change underpinning these strategies was generally poorly articulated and the effect of tested interventions was not reported using quantifiable methods. Findings suggest the need to better evaluate programmes to improve political participation of PWDs.

CANCELLED Exploring Evidence Based Approaches for Increasing Awareness for Rights and Needs of Persons with Disability through a Family and Community Centered Approach

 

Affiliation:

Effective Basic Services (eBASE) Africa

Presenter: 

Nain Mirabel Yuh

Abstract:

Effectiveness of Family-centered approach for increasing awareness on rights and needs of people living with disabilities (PLWD) has been reported. There is need to contextualize this approach for LMIC.
We sought to increase awareness on rights and needs of PLWD using a contextualized innovative family, community approach with family incentives, and community health workers (CHW).
We developed a model for automated machine assessment of disability based on the Washington Group criteria, which assigns families and communities with goals for PLWD and scores their performance for incentivisation.
We classified and integrated 30 disabled children into the community using income generating activities.
My oral presentation will share results of a smart integration of evidence from evidence ecosystem to contextualize and improve existing tools for disability.

What Are the Effects of Expanding a Social Pension Program on Extreme Poverty and Labor Supply? : Evidence from Mexico’s Pension Program for the Elderly

 

Affiliation:

WORLD BANK

Presenter: 

Clemente Avila Parra

Abstract:

In 2013, Mexico’s Social Pension Program for the Elderly (PPAM) was expanded by changing its eligibility threshold from age 70 to 65. Using Mexico’s National Household Income and Expenditure Survey, the exogenous variation around eligibility age was exploited to uncover the effects on poverty and labor supply of the newly eligible population, and to explore potential transmission mechanisms. Applying quasi-experimental methods, results show that the expansion of PPAM reduced the poverty headcount, gap and severity indexes of the elderly population. These effects are generalizable to all individuals of the treated household. The results suggest that PPAM’s expansion didn’t have short-term effects on elderly’s labor force participation. In contrast with other studies, the analysis does not find that the expansion of PPAM had crowding out effect on private transfers to the elderly.

Intergenerational social mobility based on the investments in human capital: Evidence of the long-term results of PROSPERA in health

 

Affiliation:

Center for Policy, Population & Health Research, National Autonomous University of Mexico

Presenter: 

Juan Pablo Gutierrez

Abstract:

Mexico’s CCT program, PROSPERA has demonstrated short- and medium-term positive effects on health and education. We explore whether these effects lasted in the long-term and translated into positive changes in outcomes across generations. Using intergenerational mobility analysis and quasi-experimental methods, we find evidence of intergenerational absolute mobility in height and years of schooling. Male offspring are 2.8 cm taller and have 5.3 more years of schooling than their providers, while women are 4.1 cm taller and have 5.7 more years of schooling than their providers. We find that a 1% increase in height is associated with a 10.7% and 8.8% increase in the hourly wage for men and women, respectively. PROSPERA has been successful in helping children and youth build human capital through better health and education which has led to positive returns in the labor market.

12:00 – 13:00 pm
CIUDAD DE MEXICO Room
1st floor

Lunch

13:00 – 14:00 pm 

Panel Fishbowl: FishE3

The STEMworks Design Principles Rubric – Evidence and Accountability

Affiliation:

WestEd

Chair:

Daniel Brenner

Presenters: 

Mark Loveland
Andrew Grillo-Hill
Danielle Oberbeck

Abstract:

Evidence is a key concept in evaluating STEM education programs, but how can it be measured beyond traditional academic outcomes? The STEMworks Design Principles Rubric and application process provide an opportunity for self-reflection as well as expert review and feedback. Programs must support the claims made in their self-rating with explanations and documented evidence, addressing each point of the rubric. Our presentation and discussion of the common issues faced by programs in completing the self-review, as well as the difficulties faced by the reviewers, will give a greater picture of the benefits and challenges inherent in pushing towards this type of evaluation practice. STEMworks believes that this type of rubric can be used to highlight innovative programs of all sizes – an important means of diversifying the field and recognizing quality in non-traditional areas.

14:00 – 14:15 pm

Moving to new room

14:15 pm -15:00 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room
3rd floor

CLOSING PLENARY

The Global Innovation Fund’s New Fund: GIF Growth

Chair: 

Marion Avril

Presenter: 

Alix Zwane, CEO, Global Innovation Fund

Abstract:

The Global Innovation Fund [GIF] was founded by a group of government aid agencies to find and fund development innovations with the potential to significantly improve the lives of the world’s poorest people. GIF’s investment approach puts evidence at the core of investment decision-making, seeking social impact first across its grant and risk capital portfolios.
GIF funds innovations at an early stage on their route to scale, but has identified the need for later growth stage capital to help private sector entrepreneurs scale their proven impact.
GIF Growth is a permanent capital vehicle being launched by the GIF to bridge the innovation funding gap by supporting high impact market pioneers that serve the global poor, enabling them to shape a new market.
Using GIF’s unique, impact-first and evidence-based approach, GIF Growth will deploy concessional capital into higher risk, local currency, and/or subordinated tranches using debt, equity, and hybrid instruments. GIF Growth’s catalytic capital will crowd in outside capital and accelerate business scaling to achieve an outsized impact. GIF Growth is expected to measurably improve the lives of an additional 5 million poor people each year who are able to boost their income by 10% annually.

15:00 pm – 15:15 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room
3rd floor

AWARDS

15:15 pm – 15:45 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room
3rd floor

CLOSING CEREMONY

16:00 pm

 

15:15 pm – 15:45 pm
Puebla Room
1st floor

Evidence Mapping Meeting

By invitation only

16:00 pm

 

   END OF THE CONFERENCE

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