Workshop day 2 – 15 October

8:30 am – 9:00 am
FOYER 1st floor

Registrations

HILDALGO Room (1st floor)

09:00 – 18:00 pm

ECOWK2 – full day workshop

Rapid response and systematic review: A practical application to international development

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Workshop facilitators:

Birte Snilstveit, 3ie
Lauren’s Langer, ACE
Jennifer Stevenson, Education Endowment Foundation

 

(Lunch break 1PM-2PM)

Abstract:

A practical session where participants will work together to conduct a rapid systematic review in response to an evidence request from a decision maker. The evidence request is focused on Intimate Partner Violence. It will take an existing evidence gap map a starting point and focus on co-producing a rapid synthesis and response document.
The objectives of the workshop (and webinars) are 1) To demonstrate/ test processes and methods to use evidence gap maps as a source for rapid systematic reviews; 2) To build participants’ capacity to perform key synthesis tasks.
We will run three webinars to co-produce the rapid systematic review ahead of the WWGS workshop. The webinars will focus on building skills in data extraction and synthesis through the application of these skill in practice. We will introduce tasks and work through examples together at the webinar, and participants will then be given some tasks to complete over the weeks between the sessions. The course instructors will be available to answer questions between the scheduled webinars.
This is an innovative exercise and a great opportunity for participants to gain skills and contribute to responding to a real evidence request. The webinars are open to anyone, including those not attending WWGS. For those planning to attend the in-person workshop should it is a requirement to attend at least two of the three webinars.

Schedule of webinars:
17 th September: Introduction and overview, data extraction and risk of bias assessment (3 hours)
In this webinar we will introduce the evidence request we will be working on for the next month, followed by an overview of the idea of rapid systematic reviews and rapid response. In the second half of the webinar we will go through the data extraction and risk of bias assessment tools, including applying the tool to a study.

1 st October: Calculating effect sizes and meta-analysis (3 hours)
In this webinar we will provide an overview of methods for calculating effect sizes and meta-analysis, and work with the data we have extracted to perform these tasks together.

8 th October: Discussion of findings, Question & Answer session (2 hours)
The final webinar before the face-to-face workshop will focus on discussing and interpreting the findings. It will also provide an opportunity for participants to ask any questions about the material covered so far.

All webinars will start at 2pm UK time and last 2-3 hours. You can find links to register for webinars and the in-person workshop here.

QUERETARO Room (1st floor)

09:00 – 18:00 pm

EDWK3 – full day workshop

Introduction to Meta-analysis

Affiliation:

Georgia State University and Campbell Collaboration

Presenters: 

Terri Pigott
Jeffrey Valentine

 

(lunch break 1PM-2PM)

 

Abstract:

This workshop will introduce participants to techniques of meta-analysis in a systematic review. Topics covered include: effect sizes for continuous and categorical outcomes, computation of effect sizes, random and fixed effects models of effect size, computation of the overall mean effect size and its confidence interval, exploration of effect size heterogeneity and effect size models to explore heterogeneity. The workshop will include lecture and hands-on activities to practice effect size computation and meta-analytic techniques. Techniques will be illustrated with systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in the Campbell library.

JALISCO Room (3rd floor)

09:00 – 11:00 am

HHWK2

Understanding diverse evidence synthesis products

Affiliation:

Bryn Mawr College

Presenter: 

Julia Littell

Abstract:

Diverse methods are needed to synthesize different types of evidence and to address the wide range of topics of interest to funders, policy makers, consumers, and researchers. However, stakeholders are now faced with a bewildering array of review and synthesis products including: systematic reviews, meta-analyses, network meta-analyses, rapid reviews, realist reviews, qualitative evidence syntheses, scoping reviews, and evidence and gap maps. This workshop presents an inclusive conceptual framework for classifying diverse evidence synthesis methods. It aims to help participants
• understand different types of reviews and evidence synthesis products;
• identify the goodness of fit between review questions and methods; and
• identify appropriate methods for synthesizing different types of data.

11:00 – 13:00 pm 

ECOWK11

Diagnostic approach to replication research

Affiliation:

FHI 360

Presenters: 

Annette Brown
Benjamin Wood

Abstract:

This workshop will begin with an overview of replication research covering the types of replication studies, the questions they seek to answer, and some of the recent findings and controversies arising from different types of replications. Participants will then learn the four elements of a diagnostic approach to replication studies that re-analyze the same data as the original study. These elements are: validity of assumptions, data transformations, estimation methods, and heterogeneous outcomes. In groups, participants will analyze an article to propose replication exercises according to the diagnostic approach. The workshop will close with a discussion of dos and don’ts for conducting replication research.

13:00 – 14:00 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room (3rd floor)

Lunch

14:00 – 18:00 pm

ECOWK9

Workshop on Mexico´s Multidimensional Poverty Measurement methodology

Affiliation:

Coneval

Presenter:

Alida Gutiérrez Landeros

Abstract:

This workshop is composed of two sections. The first one covers the Mexican Multidimensional Poverty Measurement methodology, it’s legal and technical foundations, the indicators and their components, and the criteria for its determination. The second section addresses the practical implementation, the theoretical elements previously learned will be used to generate information related to poverty in Mexico. The workshop is intended to provide elements to improve public policies that are aimed to reduce poverty rates, as these indicators identify opportunity areas for enhancing institutional performance and assessing priority regions where poverty and social or economic vulnerabilities prevail.

AGUASCALIENTES Room (2nd floor)

09:00 – 13:00 pm

ECOWK5

Integrating economic methods in systematic reviews related to social sciences

Affiliation:

Campbell Collaboration

Presenter: 

Denny John

Abstract:

This workshop is designed for review authors and individuals interested in incorporating economic evidence into systematic reviews, and protocols related to social sciences. Any level of knowledge is appropriate. The workshop will cover with the key principles of economic evaluation and its application in social sciences. The workshop will introduce the economic concept of efficiency and how information on cost-effectiveness can help inform judgements about efficiency. The relevance of economic evidence in Campbell intervention reviews will then be introduced, along with guidance about when explicitly including an economic perspective might be useful and how incorporating economic evidence might be done. The workshop will comprise of didactic presentation, and opportunities for questions and discussion.

13:00 – 14:00 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room (3rd floor)

Lunch

14:00 – 18:00 pm

ECOWK3

Improving evidence uptake and use: how to monitor, measure and report evidence impact

Affiliation:

International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie)

Presenters:

Kirthi Rao
Beryl Leach

Abstract:

The workshop will focus on monitoring and measuring evidence uptake and use. Facilitators will briefly cover the value of effective and well-timed engagement and how it lays the foundation for monitoring and measuring evidence use. This interactive session, will draw on 3ie’s experience with monitoring and measuring evidence uptake and use from a portfolio of completed impact evaluations and systematic reviews. Facilitators will present 3ie’s experience with applying contribution tracing methodology to a learning project to measure change and validate it rigorously. We will share the findings and lessons from this project and what we are learning about the indicators we use to measure change and report on research impact. We will describe the improvements made to our overall approach, particularly our approach to better monitoring, learning and adaptation to promote evidence use.

NUEVO LEON I Room (3rd floor)

09:00 – 13:00 pm

ECOWK1

A practical introduction to evidence maps and rapid response services as effective mechanisms for the systematic use of evidence to inform government decision-making

Presenters and affiliations:

Lauren’s Langer, Africa Centre for Evidence
Harsha Dayal, Government of South Africa
Promise Nduku, University of Johannesburg

 

Abstract:

This workshop will introduce to both researcher and policymakers the approaches of evidence maps (EM) and rapid response services (RRS) as mechanisms to enable government decision-makers to easily access and integrate the best available evidence for policy impact. Applying an interactive master class format, we will support participants to explore these two important linked mechanisms for enabling the systematic use of evidence in policy-making. The facilitators are drawn from within government and academia in South Africa. Their collaborative work to find ways to provide evidence for decision-making means the solutions that they are proposing (EM, RRS) are both relevant and effective, and have been implemented within different policy-making contexts. Participants will develop hands-on experience exploring EMs to understand their potential to inform decision-making as a source for RRS.

13:00 – 14:00 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room (3rd floor)

Lunch

14:00 – 18:00 pm

ECOWK8

Leveraging evidence in the design of new governance strategies to reduce corruption in the extractive sector

Affiliation:

Results for Development / Brookings

Presenters:

Robin Lewis
Erin Fletcher
Mario Picon

Abstract:

The Leveraging transparency to reduce corruption program (LTRC), a joint initiative of Brookings, R4D and NRGI, is a knowledge platform and governance lab that systematizes evidence on approaches to reduce corruption in the extractive sector and pilots new strategies worldwide.
LTRC’s workshop will provide an overview of what we have learned from a global evidence review, including how strategic approaches that combine transparency, accountability, participation and what we call complementary factors offer a higher probability of success. The workshop will focus on key corruption risks along the natural resource value chain, their consequences to development outcomes, and strategies to build policy and programs informed by evidence. We will have guest speakers representing international and Mexican partners. Workshop proceedings will be use in identification of new pilots.
The workshop will be structured in three main sections:
Building the approach to our program on the evidence base, and looking at co-creation and adaptive learning [technical section]
Case studies from the evidence base to build strategic approaches to engage participants. [group exercise]
Roundtable with experiences from guests and participants [open discussion – practicalities – challenges]

YUCATAN Room (1st floor)

08:00 – 13:00 pm

SIDE EVENT (Open to all)

SDG implementation: Lessons from across the globe

Presenters:

Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Co-Director
Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
Centre of Excellence in Women and Child Health, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

Fahad Siddiqui
Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

Sameen Siddiqui
Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

Abstract:

Description:
The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were succeeded by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) after its agenda was ratified in Sept 2015. In order to review implementation strategies since that time, our group has carried out a systematic literature review and synthesis, developed a tool to collect in-depth information from key stakeholders across various geographies, and held regional consultations. This session will present the results of our systematic review, in-depth country and regional consultations, and a synthesis in order to provide the audience with the emerging picture on implementation of the health-related SDGs. The session will have a question and answer session at the end where participants can also share their experiences.

Objectives:
– Share evidence on implementation of SDG: Progress & Challenges
– Share learning from key informants from selected countries on implementation of SDG
– Obtain feedback from workshop participants

Background:
Implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and monitoring against global indicators has been led by the United Nations (UN), and country and regional level efforts are led by intercountry stakeholders, including governments, civil society, academia, and the private sector. As a result, implementation and progress tracking models, tools, and approaches vary between countries with limited coordination across these efforts. Therefore, understanding patterns of interaction as well as bottlenecks and contextual factors is essential.
The “Assessment of Different Implementation and Development Models of Health and Health-Related Sustainable Development Goals (IM-SDG): A Systematic Review, Synthesis of Prior Experience and Targeted Country Consultations” project aims to identify globally implemented sustainable approaches, models, and technologies, and to find the shortcomings in SDGs’ implementation at the country level.
A global synthesis of existing strategies and concepts for implementing and monitoring health and health-related SDGs, a review of existing experiences from the IDRC Think Tank project outputs, the experience of AKU’s Center of Excellence for Women and Child Health (CoE-WCH), and a global systematic review of multi-sectoral strategies to address SDGs covering the last 5 years was done. This was followed by consultations across five countries where AKDN and/or IDRC has a strong network and can bring together stakeholders (Government, INGOs, UN, and Civil Society). Specific countries were selected after an initial gap mapping exercise. Linkages with other SDGs were also sought.

Agenda
8:00am – 8:15am Registration, material distribution & introduction of participants
8:15am – 8:30am Background & rationale of work – Zulfiqar A. Bhutta
8:30am – 9:00am Systematic Review of evidence on SDG implementation efforts – Fahad J. Siddiqui
9:00am – 9:15am SDG implementation and national consultation in Peru – Luis Huicho
9:15am – 10:00am Country consultations & lessons from various contexts – Sameen Siddiqui
10:00am – 10:15am Short break
10:15am – 11:00am A proposed pragmatic strategy for accelerating progress – Zulfiqar A. Bhutta
11:00am – 11:45am Q&A, comments

13:00 – 14:00 pm
NUEVO LEON II Room (3rd floor)

Lunch

14:00 – 17:30 pm

SIDE EVENT (Open to all)

Stunting reduction drivers in Low and Middle Income countries: a common case study framework and recommendations for impact

Presenters:

Emily Keats
Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

Luis Huicho
Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru

Oliver Rothschild
Gates Ventures, Kirkland, WA

Tyler Vaivada
Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada

Chairs:

Peter Tugwell
University of Toronto, Canada

Zulfiqar A. Bhutta, Co-Director
Centre for Global Child Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada
Centre of Excellence in Women and Child Health, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan

Abstract:

Description
The session will overview the etiology of growth faltering in children, and explore the distribution and determinants of child stunting reduction in low and middle income countries. First, the epidemiology and determinants of child stunting will be presented, drawing on global frameworks and data from systematic reviews. Next, the novel and holistic Exemplars in Global Health (EGH) approach for studying country case studies (“exemplars”) in child stunting reduction will be discussed. A detailed country example (e.g. Peru, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal) will be subsequently presented. The session will end with a discussion on cross-country learnings and recommendations.

Objectives
– To discuss stunting reduction exemplars methods and results with key stakeholders for input and iteration
– To encourage uptake of methodology for conducting country case studies
– To share key country and global findings on stunting reduction determinants for policy/program discussions

Background
Exemplars in Global Health (EGH) conducts systematic and comprehensive mixed-methods studies on priority health and development topics to generate primary evidence for steering policy dialogue and learnings across countries. EGH has projects in Child Stunting, Under-5 Mortality, Community Health Workers, and Mass Drug Administration. This current session covers background, methods and key findings for the child stunting exemplars topic.
Child stunting is associated with high mortality, morbidity and suboptimal cognitive and motor development. It is highly prevalent in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), however several countries and regions have had dramatic reductions in the chronic condition over the past 15 years. As a major underlying determinant of the burden of disease and mortality among children under age 5 years in LMICs, further efforts to address stunting are paramount for sustaining and scaling up health and survival goals in the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) agenda. To this end, a thorough understanding of current burden/trends, determinants and success factors/barriers of reducing stunting is needed to effectively target this global public health crisis. EGH undertakes in-depth evaluations of policies, programs and factors in a set of countries that have had dramatic reductions in stunting (coined “exemplar nations”) to understand major contributors and success factors. At present, the project has studied Peru, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Senegal and Ethiopia as representative exemplars from Latin America, Central Asia, South Asia, West Africa and East Africa, respectively.
This event will the discuss background, methods and results of case studies as part of the EGH stunting project: 1) A global systematic literature review illustrates conceptual frameworks for understanding determinants of child stunting and discusses drivers from existing evidence. 2) The EGH novel mixed-methods framework to studying exemplar stories is presented and 3) illustrated through country examples. We discuss the process of identifying exemplar countries, selecting and engaging topic experts, collating and summarizing available evidence, undertaking rigorous qualitative and quantitative analyses, and preparing dissemination products for diverse audiences.4) Cross-country findings from several stunting exemplar case studies form the basis for policy and recommendations.

Agenda
2:00pm – 2:15pm Registration, material distribution & introduction of participants – Venkatesh Mannar & Zulfiqar Bhutta (Chairs)
2:15pm – 2:30pm Background & rationale of work – Oliver Rothschild
2:30pm – 3:00pm Global review of child stunting determinants – Tyler Vaivada
3:00pm – 3:30pm Exemplars in child stunting reduction: case study methodology – Emily Keats
3:30pm – 4:00pm Determinants of child stunting reduction in Peru – Luis Huicho
4:00pm – 4:15pm Short break
4:15pm – 5:00pm Cross-country findings and recommendations – Zulfiqar A. Bhutta
5:00pm – 5:25pm General discussion from the floor
5:25pm – 5:30pm Concluding remarks – Venkatesh Mannar

17:30 – 19:30 pm

ADDITIONAL SIDE EVENT (Open to all)

Founding meeting for Nutrition and Food security Coordinating Group

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